When asked about their personal experience with moving houses, most people respond instinctively with a cringe. Memories of anxiety, fatigue, and financial malaise seem to make the majority of movers associate the transition with stress and lack of well-being.

However, most negative moving experiences are the result of a negative mindset, not a truly bad situation. The health burdens often blamed on moving — weight gain, insomnia, panic, bursts of anger, exhaustion, etc. — are really no more than products of a pessimistic outlook.

In actuality, moving is one of the best things you can do for your health, inside and out. This article just touches on a few but, chances are, once you take the leap of faith to pack those first few boxes, you’ll start to feel the stirrings of positive transformation.

One big change outside; better changes inside

There’s no denying it: moving is a big decision. But it’s also a decision people rarely regret. After all, few good things in life ever come from staying inside of a comfort zone. When you look back on your life, at the events that left a lasting impact on your identity and the experiences that sculpted your beliefs, which ones were more impactful: the safe choices that soon after devolved into boredom, or the risky actions that elevated your courage and that made your heart soar in anticipation of the unknown?

Okay, maybe that’s a rather romanticized take on the experience of moving, but it’s not too far from the truth. Whether you’re changing homes to take that new job, to merge lives with a partner, or to see a foreign part of the world, there really isn’t much bad that can come out of moving.

Even if you assume the worst possible outcome for your move, your old hometown will always be there for you to return to — unless, of course, there’s a zombie apocalypse.

You deserve new things

The last time you went to your favorite store, how long did you have to argue with yourself before you decided to buy something? Despite the rampant materialism that pervades American culture, the average cost-conscious consumer can find it very difficult to allow themselves the indulgence of a new product when it’s something they really want.

Whether moving is a serious possibility or a passing fancy, consider this: if you follow through, you’ll have a perfectly sound reason to buy new furniture, storage bins, linens, appliances, and then some! The best part is, you won’t have to defend your decision to yourself or to others. Moving houses is a fresh start, and new beginnings call for new belongings.

If you’re not much of a shopper, think about the reverse benefit: now you have an excuse to sell all that junk you’ve been dying to clear out of the basement and spare rooms!

Find some more friends

If you’re changing homes, chances are you’re changing jobs and cities, too. This can be daunting, but it’s also a fantastic opportunity to meet lots of interesting people. As the old cliche goes, “Variety is the spice of life,” and the greater you vary the people with whom you surround yourself, otherwise bland activities will start to feel more exotic.

Going to the same restaurant or museum with the same person every week would get old very quickly. But in a new town, you can visit the same places with different people and have entirely different experiences. And as you observe how these friends behave uniquely in various environments, getting to know them will feel both natural and novel.

By no means are we saying you have to give up your old friends. We’re just saying that the fresh spaces created from an unfamiliar environment will leave plenty of room for new ones.

Discover more about yourself

All major changes from marriage to unemployment to moving are bound to test one’s character. But that is precisely why we find difficult tasks so rewarding.

As you go through the process of moving, assess your own behavior and thoughts. How do you label boxes: with plenty of detail, by room, by color coding? How will you be moving your things: solo, with friends, with a moving company? Are you someone who unpacks right away, or someone who waits a few weeks? Are you satisfied with all of your responses, or are there some things you’d like to change?

Change a lot or change a little, any kind of move will have at least some impact on your life. If you decide the shift is going to be stressful, you will experience stress. On the other hand, if you choose to see the transition as a boon to your physical, mental and social health, that is precisely what you will see happen.


At Friendly Movers, we like to keep things as simple and stress-free as possible. A move shouldn’t consume every part of your life, so let us do the difficult stuff while you enjoy the benefits of a fresh start. Contact us today to learn more and get a free quote.